Notices

  • admin posted an update 2 days, 19 hours ago

    Is a Fox a cat or a dog?
    A “dog fox” is not a dog-fox hybrid, but a male fox. Foxes are canids, like dogs, but foxes are a separate species. A fox is neither a dog nor a cat. A “dog fox” is not a dog-fox hybrid, but a male fox. Foxes are canids, like dogs, but foxes are a separate species.

  • admin posted an update 2 days, 19 hours ago

    Foxes are small-to-medium-sized, omnivorous mammals belonging to several genera of the family Canidae. Foxes are slightly smaller than a medium-size domestic dog, with a flattened skull, upright triangular ears, a pointed, slightly upturned snout, and a long bushy tail.
    Scientific name: Canidae
    Height: 13.78 inch (35 cm) – 19.69 inch (50 cm) on a…[Read more]

  • admin posted an update 4 days, 12 hours ago

    New ABC Daily ABC English Crash Course e-mails have been sent out.

  • Deborah Braswell, a university administrator in Alabama, is a member of a dwindling group — people with a landline phone at home.

    According to a U.S. government study released Thursday, 50.8 percent of homes […]

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The Halloween Solar Storms were a series of solar flares and coronal mass ejections that occurred from mid-October to early November 2003, peaking around October 28–29. Satellite-based systems and communications were affected, aircraft were advised to avoid high altitudes near the polar regions, and a one-hour-long power outage occurred in S…[Read more]

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The Halloween Solar Storms were a series of solar flares and coronal mass ejections that occurred from mid-October to early November 2003, peaking around October 28–29.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The Bastille Day Flare or Bastille Day Event was a powerful solar flare on July 14, 2000, the national day of France, occurring near the peak of the solar maximum in solar cycle 23. The X5.7-class flare originated from a sunspot known as Active region 9077, which subsequently caused an S3 radiation storm on Earth fifteen minutes later as energetic…[Read more]

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The Bastille Day Flare or Bastille Day Event was a powerful solar flare on July 14, 2000, the national day of France, occurring near the peak of the solar maximum in solar cycle 23.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS), formerly the Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale (SSHS), classifies hurricanes – Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions, and tropical storms – into five categories distinguished by the intensities of their sustained winds.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale is a 1 to 5 rating based on a hurricane’s sustained wind speed. This scale estimates potential property damage. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 and higher are considered major hurricanes because of their potential for significant loss of life and damage.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    A disdrometer is an instrument used to measure the drop size distribution and velocity of falling hydrometeors. Some disdrometers can distinguish between rain, graupel, and hail. The uses for disdrometers are numerous. They can be used for traffic control, scientific examination, airport observation systems, and hydrology. The latest disdrometers…[Read more]

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The Fujita scale (F-Scale), or Fujita–Pearson scale, is a scale for rating tornado intensity, based primarily on the damage tornadoes inflict on human-built structures and vegetation.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The Beaufort scale /ˈboʊfərt/ is an empirical measure that relates wind speed to observed conditions at sea or on land. Its full name is the Beaufort wind force scale. The scale was devised in 1805 by Francis Beaufort (later Rear Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort), an Irish Royal Navy officer, while serving in HMS Woolwich.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    A pileus, also called scarf cloud or cap cloud, is a small, horizontal, lenticular cloud that can appear above a cumulus or cumulonimbus cloud, giving the parent cloud a characteristic “hoodlike” appearance. Pilei tend to change shape rapidly. They are formed by strong updraft at lower altitudes, acting upon moist air above, causing the air to…[Read more]

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    Where does weather occur?
    Almost all familiar weather phenomena occur in the troposphere (the lower part of the atmosphere). Weather does occur in the stratosphere and can affect weather lower down in the troposphere, but the exact mechanisms are poorly understood.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The exosphere is a thin, atmosphere-like volume surrounding a planetary body where molecules are gravitationally bound to that body, but where the density is too low for them to behave as a gas by colliding with each other.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The mesosphere is the layer of the Earth’s atmosphere that is directly above the stratopause and directly below the mesopause. In the mesosphere temperature decreases as the altitude increases. The upper boundary of the mesosphere is the mesopause, which can be the coldest naturally occurring place on Earth with temperatures below 130 K.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    The stratosphere is the second major layer of Earth’s atmosphere, just above the troposphere, and below the mesosphere. It is stratified in temperature, with warmer layers higher up and cooler layers farther down. This is in contrast to the troposphere near the Earth’s surface, which is cooler higher up and warmer farther down.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    In meteorology, a cloud is an aerosol comprising a visible mass of liquid droplets or frozen crystals made of water or various chemicals. The droplets or particles are suspended in the atmosphere above the surface of a planetary body. On Earth clouds are formed by the saturation of air in the homosphere when air cools or gains water vapor.

  • admin posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    Nephophobia (Nepho is Greek for cloud) is an excessive fear of clouds. People who experience this phobia will not look up in the sky at clouds. This fear may be related to other fears concerning weather; such as, impending rain, thunderstorms, or lightning.

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